Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Best Of: Ferguson: They thought they were free

© Unknown
The police before a rally Wednesday in Ferguson,
Mo., where an unarmed teenager, Michael
Brown, was shot by an officer last week.
Sott.net | Aug 18, 2014 | Allen L. Roland
"The world you live in - your nation, your people - is not the world you were born in at all. The forms are all there, all untouched, all reassuring, the houses, the shops, the jobs, the mealtimes, the visits, the concerts, the cinema, the holidays. But the spirit, which you never noticed because you made the lifelong mistake of identifying it with the forms, is changed."
Spurred on by 9/11 and the War on Terror, America has become a feared military force of terror but the prime target has always been the American public which is becoming increasingly aware of their Government sponsored militarized police who see and relate to them as Middle East terrorists until proven innocent such as in Ferguson, Missouri. The military-style occupation of Ferguson, Missouri has ripped aside the thin veneer of democracy to expose a budding police state. This is what martial law looks like.

As I watch, with alarm, the rapidly growing American militarized Police State as well as George W Bush and Dick Cheney's recent book tours - where they rationalize their illegal wars and economic rape of Iraq and Afghanistan as well as justify torture as a means to this criminal end - I am immediately reminded of Milton Mayer's classic They Thought They Were Free: The Germans, 1933-45.

Mayer's book describes the slow but sure seduction of the German people as their civil liberties, freedoms and moral values were gradually stripped away by Hitler's fascist government while waving the flag of national security and patriotism.
But Then It Was Too Late: "What happened here was the gradual habituation of the people, little by little, to being governed by surprise; to receiving decisions deliberated in secret; to believing that the situation was so complicated that the government had to act on information which the people could not understand, or so dangerous that, even if the people could not understand it, it could not be released because of national security. And their sense of identification with Hitler, their trust in him, made it easier to widen this gap and reassured those who would otherwise have worried about it ... this separation of government from people, this widening of the gap, took place so gradually and so insensibly, each step disguised (perhaps not even intentionally) as a temporary emergency measure or associated with true patriotic allegiance or with real social purposes. And all the crises and reforms (real reforms, too) so occupied the people that they did not see the slow motion underneath, of the whole process of government growing remoter and remoter." Pg. 166 / 167 They thought they were Free
Read more..

No comments:

Post a Comment